Tag Archives: London

UK Revisited

Less than a week after I returned from Asheville, I packed the family up and we flew to London for the holidays. I got to brew another beer with Fergus Fitzgerald at Adnams in Southwold, this time an 8.5% Double IPA (California Style!) that will be dry-hopped with Centennial, Citra and Mosaic. This beer should be available in Wetherspoons pubs in mid-January.

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It’s become a tradition-my first beer after arriving in the UK is always a Fuller’s!

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I love seeing historical brewing sites-this was in London.

I am very curious to see how people react to our beer, since the alcohol ¬†is much higher than what beer drinkers in Britain generally find acceptable. It’s an interesting point of difference between the US and UK beer drinking cultures. When having beer discussions with folks in the UK, the alcohol content is one of the first things always mentioned when describing a beer. ¬†Whereas, in the US, some of the first things we mention are the IBUs and/or hop varieties. It’s part of the culture in the UK to drink multiple pints in a session at a pub, so the alcohol content is kind of an important consideration, I get it. But it also sometimes seems a little extreme, like when we brewed our first beer for JD Wetherspoon back in 2008, a 7.2% IPA that many people wouldn’t even try because the alcohol was so high. I’m sure we’ll have people on both sides of the fence with this beer, and am looking forward to seeing any comments. I do think craft beer fans will really like this beer.

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The recipe sheet for our Double IPA.

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Mash-in complete. West Coast IPA!

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This was the street our cottage was on. At the end of the street, turn right and you’re at the Adnams Brewery.

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Cool historical poster at Adnams

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Hop Dosing system at Adnams.

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We mashed in at 5:00am, and so I got to get some shots of an amazing sunrise from the Southwold shoreline at about 8:00 am.

On Christmas Eve, we went back to London and spent 3 days there with the family. It was a great opportunity, the kids had never been out of the country before.

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I have a lot of pictures of my son’s hand.

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We took a Thames River Cruise on Christmas day, and saw this guy piloting an amphibious car.

London in the evening was beautiful:

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Going to England (again)

We just made arrangements today for me to fly over to England in September with our Lead Brewer, Jeremy Moynier, to brew a beer with an English brewer for the Wetherspoons pub chain. Wetherspoons puts on an International Real Ale Festival twice each year, and has a program where they invite brewers from other countries to brew beer at select English breweries. All the beer is made as Real Ale, meaning it all goes in casks, is clarified to brilliant crystal clear without filtration, and is naturally carbonated, and served from the cask using a beer engine.

Stone Brewing Co. has participated in this program with Wetherspoons twice over the years. In fact, we were the first American Brewery to participate, back in early 2008, when Stone Brewing Co. cofounder, President and original Brewmaster Steve Wagner and I got to brew at the Shepherd-Neame Brewery in Faversham, which bills itself as the oldest operating brewery in England. That beer we brewed with the great brewers at Shepherd-Neame was an IPA, weoriginally wanted to do an 8-9% abv Double IPA, but the Wetherspoons folks balked at that because it was too high in alcohol. After some negotiation, we settled on a 7% West Coast style IPA.

Steve wanted to call this beer “California Mild” which still makes me laugh, but what I really found interesting is that when Stone cofounder and CEO Greg Koch and I went back for the release party at one of the Wetherspoons Pubs in London, there were many people, including some fellow brewers, who would not even try the beer because it was “so strong”. There were some I couldn’t persuade to even try a small taste. I learned then a bit of the real differences between the beer scene in England vs. the beer scene here in the United States, especially with regards to alcoholcontent. In the United States, many craft beer drinkers look for high alcohol, and are happy sticking to 1-2 pints over the course of an evening. In England, many of the beer drinkers want 3-4%, and that’s it. Anything above that teeters dangerously close to the dreaded “binge drinking” label. The pub drinking culture in England is totally different, and revolves around drinking many pints among friends, so the lower alcohol is an important consideration. And to be fair, there were many brewers, including David Holmes from Shepherd-Neame and John Bryan from Oakham Ales in Peterborough who really enjoyed our beer as well. It was during this trip that I gained a very deep appreciation for traditional English brewing and for good Real Ale. It was a fantastic experience, and I was really glad to be able to help set up some of my craft brewer friends to participate in the same program over the past few years. One of the nicest surprises that came out of this particular trip was that for a short while, the beer we brewed had the highest ranking of all British Beers on ratebeer.

Britain Best Beers

 

Wetherspoons Real Ale Festival Pump Clips

Mitch and former Team Stone Member, Collaborator and good friend Toshi Ishii pouring their beers. I’m not caring that some people won’t try it- more for me!

The second opportunity for Stone came in the fall of 2011, when I traveled solo to the Wadworth Brewery in Devizes, near Bath and Bristol. This time we brewed something a little more British, at least in terms of alcohol content. We brewed a Session IPA, loosely inspired by the collaboration brew we had made with San Diego homebrewer extraordinaire Kelsey McNair and Colby Chandler from Ballast Point. That was a very fun experiences-Devizes is a wonderfully quaint village, and there was literally a Wadworth pub on every corner of the main street through town. The brewers there treated me wonderfully, and I got some great sightseeing in.

The Wadworth Brewery, a great example of a traditional English brewer.

The Wadworth Brewery, a great example of a traditional English brewer.

Pump Clip for the San Diego Session IPA

Pump Clip for the San Diego Session IPA

So this time, we are brewing at Adnams in Southwold, on the East coast of England, with Fergus Fitzgerald, a brewer Steve and I met a few years ago with Martyn Cornell during one of our research trips for the IPA book. Fergus brews some great beers, and has a love for American hop varieties, so we are looking forward to putting this beer together with him. And congratulations are in order, as Fergus was just named Brewer Of The Year

I am looking forward to spending a little time in London, visiting some of my favorite pubs, including The Rake, The White Horse, Churchill Arms, Craft Brewing Company, and wherever else our travels take us. We hope to visit some London brewers as well-will keep you posted on that.